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Saturday, March 27, 2010

OSTEOPATHIC ADJUSTMENT COMPARED TO CONVENTIONAL TMD TREATMENT.

A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL (see abstract below) OF OSTEOPATHIC TREATMENT AND CONVENTIONAL TMD TREATMENT REVEALED THEY WERE APPROXIMATELY EQUAL WITH THE OSTEOPATHIC GROUP USING LESS MEDICATION.

THIS STUDY IS IMPORTANT FOR TWO REASONS. FIRST, IT SHOWS THAT THERE IS AN INTIMATE CONNECTION BETWEEN THE NECK AND THE JAW. FOR THE PURPOSES OF A STUDY IT MAKES SENSE TO DO A RANDOMIZED TRIAL. IF THE HEALTH AND WELLNESS OF THE PATIENT IS OUR FIRST CONCERN COMBINING TREATMENTS IS THE MOST EFFECTIVE COURSE.

THE SECOND POINT IS THAT CONVENTIONAL TMD THERAPY NEEDS IMPROVEMENT. NEUROMUSCULAR DENTISTRY CAN PROVIDE VASTLY SUPERIOR RESULTS THAN CONVENTIONAL TMD THERAPY. THE STUDY PUBLISHED IN CRANIO JOURNAL BY DR BARRY COOPER SHOWED THAT NEUROMUSCULAR DENTISTRY WAS "OVERWHELMINGLY SUCCESSFUL" IN TREATING THESE PROBLEMS.

I have found that combining Neuromuscular Dental Treatment with Atlas/Orthogonal, NUCCA, or Cranial-sacral therapy can improve treatment as well.

The majority of patients with TMJ disorders also have sleep disorders. Treating both the sleep and daytime problems can drastically improve patients results.

"Osteopathic manual therapy versus conventional conservative therapy in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders: A randomized controlled trial

A.M. Cucciaa, b, , , C. Caradonnaa, b, V. Annunziatab and D. Caradonnaa, b
a Department of Dental Sciences “G. Messina”, University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 129, 90128 Palermo, Italy
b School of Specialization in Orthodontics, University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 129, 90128 Palermo, Italy
Received 10 April 2009; revised 1 August 2009; accepted 12 August 2009. Available online 20 September 2009.
Summary
Objective
Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is a term reflecting chronic, painful, craniofacial conditions usually of unclear etiology with impaired jaw function. The effect of osteopathic manual therapy (OMT) in patients with TMD is largely unknown, and its use in such patients is controversial. Nevertheless, empiric evidence suggests that OMT might be effective in alleviating symptoms. A randomized controlled clinical trial of efficacy was performed to test this hypothesis.
Methods
We performed a randomized, controlled trial that involved adult patients who had TMD. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: an OMT group (25 patients, 12 males and 13 females, age 40.6 ± 11.03) and a conventional conservative therapy (CCT) group (25 patients, 10 males and 15 females, age 38.4 ± 15.33).
At the first visit (T0), at the end of treatment (after six months, T1) and two months after the end of treatment (T2), all patients were subjected to clinical evaluation. Assessments were performed by subjective pain intensity (visual analogue pain scale, VAS), clinical evaluation (Temporomandibular index) and measurements of the range of maximal mouth opening and lateral movement of the head around its axis.
Results
Patients in both groups improved during the six months. The OMT group required significantly less medication (non-steroidal medication and muscle relaxants) (P < 0.001).
Conclusions
The two therapeutic modalities had similar clinical results in patients with TMD, even if the use of medication was greater in CCT group. Our findings suggest that OMT is a valid option for the treatment of TMD.
Keywords: OMT; Physical therapy; Stomatognathic system; Occlusal splint; Masticatory muscle"

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posted by Dr Shapira at 4:31 AM

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