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Thursday, March 25, 2010

Risk of Falls, Hospitalization from Falls and Prevention of Falls with Neuromuscular Dentistry

An interesting article in Science Daily (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100324094644.htm) discusses an new method to estimate the risk of falls. Neuromuscular Dentistry can reduce the risks of falls. It has been used to treat vertigo and dizziness as well as other middle ear dysfunctions related to the TM Joint (TMJ).

THE RISK OF FALLING IS A MAJOR CONCERN FOR OLDER ADULTS BUT APPARANTLY IS ALSO A PROBLEM AT ALL AGES. Neuromuscular Dentistry can lower the risk of dangerous falls. Can Neuromuscular Dentistry save medicare. According to the article 40% of all senior hospital admissions are related to falls and over a third of seniors over age 65 fall annually. If neuromuscular dental appliances could reduce fallsin seniors by only 10% it would save medicare tens of billions of dollars in hospital and rehabilitation costs and prevent the rapid deterioration to the quality of seniors lives often associated with falls.

Neuromuscular Dentistry is based on the work of Dr Barney Jankelson who applied physiological measurements to dentistry. His work has resulted in help for patients with migraines, tension headaches and TMJ disorders (http://www.ihateheadaches.org). It is also extremely effective in helping balance and postural issues. The New Orleans Saints utilized Neuromuscular Dentistry to help win the Superbowl. The PPM Mouthguard or Pure Power Mouthguard was developed by Neuromuscular Dentist Anil Makkar to improve physical performance including balance strengthand flexibility. A Rutger's Study confirmed these effects.

The Pure Power Mouthpiece mproves balance in athletes but can it do the same for seniors or other patients with balance problems? If the number of falls could be reduced the savings to medicare would be enormous. An explanation of the science behind Neuromuscular Dentistry can be found in Sleep and Health Journal at http://www.sleepandhealth.com/neuromuscular-dentistry

ICCMO, the International College of CranioMandibular Orthopedics is the professional association that consists of medical professional (pimarily dentists) who are trained in Neuromuscular Dentistry and in correcting the physiology of the stomatognathic and trigeminal systems. Neuromuscular Dentistry primarily addresses the health of the Trigeminal Nerve that accounts for over 50% of the total input to the brain. The trigemono-vascular system is a primary agentof almost all chronic headaches including Migraines,Chronic Daily Headaches, Tension-Type Headaches, Episodic Tension-Type Headaches, Sinus Pain, TMD, Retroorbital Headaches, Morning headaches, Facial Pain and other common pain syndromes.

The NIH has numerous studies on alternative medicine techniques. I believe that the NIH should evaluate the Rutger's study and use it as a template for a study addressing balance and avoidance of falls universally but especially in seniors. Forward head posture ncreases problems with balance and can be addressed by orthopedic correction of mandibular position utilizing diagnostic neuromuscular orthotics.

Another recent article in Gait and Posture "showed that voluntary teeth clenching contributed to stabilization of the postural stance perturbed transiently by electrical stimulation. We concluded that voluntary teeth clenching plays an important role in rapid postural adaptation to the anterior-posterior perturbation in the upright position." This study was an experimental electrical impulse to disrupt posture and voluntary closure of the teeth restored posture.. This entire field relates back to the work of Sherrington and the righting reflex.

Gait Posture. 2010 Jan;31(1):122-5. Epub 2009 Oct 30.
Influence of voluntary teeth clenching on the stabilization of postural stance disturbed by electrical stimulation of unilateral lower limb.

Fujino S, Takahashi T, Ueno T.
Department of Sports Medicine and Dentistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549, Japan. sfujino.spmd@tmd.ac.jp
Studies on the relationship between dental occlusion and body balance have suggested that occlusion status contributes to the maintenance of postural balance. However, little has been reported about the effects of voluntary teeth clenching on the stabilization of postural stance in novel environments. In the present study we investigated whether teeth clenching influenced adaptation to the perturbation introduced by electrical stimulation of a unilateral lower limb. Subjects (12 adults) stood on a force plate, from which motion data were obtained in the horizontal plane with and without voluntary teeth clenching and were instructed to maintain the position throughout the experiment. We evoked a novel environment by supramaximal percutaneous electrical stimulation of the common peroneal nerve. Electromyograms (EMG) were recorded from the masseter and the peroneus longus (PL) muscles with bipolar surface cup electrodes. When the disturbed postural stance was generated by electrical stimulation, the maximum reaction force in the anterior-posterior (A/P) direction with teeth clenching (CL) was significantly smaller than that without voluntary teeth clenching (control; CO) (p<0.05) and the peak time of the ground reaction force/body mass (GRF/BM) in the A/P direction occurred earlier in the CL condition than CO (p<0.05). There were no significant differences in the peak-to-peak amplitude of GRF/BM and the peak time of GRF/BM, in the M/L direction under both CL and CO conditions. Thus, the present study showed that voluntary teeth clenching contributed to stabilization of the postural stance perturbed transiently by electrical stimulation. We concluded that voluntary teeth clenching plays an important role in rapid postural adaptation to the anterior-posterior perturbation in the upright position. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V.

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posted by Dr Shapira at 8:13 AM

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