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Friday, January 22, 2010

PREVENTING HEADACHES IN OUR CHILDREN THRU EARLY INTERVENTION

I HAVE REPRINTED AN ENTRY FROM THE I HATE CPAP BLOG THAT EXPLAINS WHY MANY HEADACHE PROBLEMS PERSIST AND RUN IN FAMILIES. THEIR IS A DEVELOPMENT PATHWAY THAT LEADS TO PHYSICAL AND STRUCTURAL CHANGES THAT LEAD TO HEADACHES AND MIGRAINES. WHILE NEUROMUSCULAR DENTISTRY ALLOWS US TO TREAT PATIENTS AND ALLEVIATE THE MIGRAINES AND OTHER HEADACHES IT IN IMPORTANT THAT WE RECOGNIZE THAT THESE PROBLES ARE OFTEN PREVENTABLE IF WE ACT EARLY TO PROTECT OUR CHILDREN.

FROM I HATE CPAP BLOG
DEVELOPMENTAL CHANGES IN CHILDREN WITH SLEEP APNEA MUST BE ADDRESSED AFTER REMOVAL OF TONSILS AND ADENOIDS
A recent study in the International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology looked at arch Maxillary (upper jaw) development in children with snoring and sleep apnea and evaluated changes after adenotonsillar surgery. The physical changes did not correct after surgery and these children were left with residual problems that could plague the for their entire life. The authors concluded " Dento-facial development in snoring children is not changed by adenotonsillar surgery regardless of symptom relief. If snoring persists or relapses orthodontic maxillar widening and/or functional training should be considered. Collaboration between otorhinolaryngologist, orthodontists and speech and language pathologists is strongly recommended."

It is essential that the pediatric and dental communities recognize that children do not grow and eliminate the problems of enlarged tonsils and adenoids but rather they experience distorted growth that must be corrected. Early diagnosis and treatment of airway is essential for proper dento-facial growth. The NHLBI considers sleep apnea to be a TMJ Disorder. Sleep Apnea, Snoring, Migraines, Tension Headaches, Chronic Daily Headaches and TMJ disorders all begin in a common developmental pathway.

Dental Sleep Meicine and Neuromuscular Dentistry are key in improving the quality of live of these patients as adults. Early intervention may greatly reduce the number of patients who develop these problems.

nt J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2009 Nov 23. [Epub ahead of print]
Development of craniofacial and dental arch morphology in relation to sleep disordered breathing from 4 to 12 years. Effects of adenotonsillar surgery.
Löfstrand-Tideström B, Hultcrantz E.

Department of Surgical Sciences, Division of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Uppsala, SE - 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
OBJECTIVES: To study the development of craniofacial and dental arch morphology in children with sleep disordered breathing in relation to adenotonsillar surgery. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: From a community-based cohort of 644 children, 393 answered questionnaires at age 4, 6 and 12 years. Out of this group, 25 children who were snoring regularly at age 4 could be followed up to age 12 together with 24 controls not snoring at age 4, 6 and 12 years. Study casts were obtained from cases and controls and lateral cephalograms from the cases. Analysis regarding facial features and dento-alveolar development was performed. RESULTS: Children snoring regularly at age 4 showed reduced transversal width of the maxilla and more frequently had anterior open bite and lateral cross-bite than the controls. These conditions persisted for most cases at age 6, by which time 18/25 had been operated for snoring. In most of the cases, surgery cured the snoring temporarily, but their width of the maxilla was still smaller by age 12-even when nasal breathing was attained. At age 12, the frequency of lateral cross-bite was much reduced and anterior open bite was resolved, both in cases and controls. The children who snored regularly at age 12 operated or not operated, showed a long face anatomy and were oral breathers (this applied even to those who were operated). The seven cases who were not operated and the five who were still snoring in spite of surgery at age 12, did not have reduced maxillary width as compared to the controls. CONCLUSION: Dento-facial development in snoring children is not changed by adenotonsillar surgery regardless of symptom relief. If snoring persists or relapses orthodontic maxillar widening and/or functional training should be considered. Collaboration between otorhinolaryngologist, orthodontists and speech and language pathologists is strongly recommended.

PMID: 19939470 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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posted by Dr Shapira at 4:21 AM

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